Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Department of Physics, Qom Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qom, Iran.

2 Department of Civil Engineering, Nowshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Nowshahr, Iran

Abstract

The current geological and tectonic setting of Iran is due to the ongoing convergence between the Arabian and Eurasian Plates, which resulted in the formation of the Iranian plateau, mountain building, extensive deformation and seismicity. The Iranian plateau is characterized by various domains including the continental collision and the oceanic plate seduction. Based on S receiver functions are provided a high resolution image of lithosphere beneath Iran.
The current geological and tectonic setting of Iran is due to the ongoing convergence between the Arabian and Eurasian Plates, which resulted in the formation of the Iranian plateau, mountain building, extensive deformation and seismicity. The Iranian plateau is characterized by various domains including the continental collision and the oceanic plate seduction. Based on S receiver functions are provided a high resolution image of lithosphere beneath Iran. In the present work, we used data from teleseismic events (at epicentral distances between 60°-85° with magnitude over 5.7 (Mb)) recorded from 1995 to 2011 at 53 national permanent short period stations which are located in the different geological zones of Iran. The Sp phase conversion arriving at times ranging between 8.6 and 13.0 s delay time. In order to enhance the conversions and reduce the error of the depth determination, the S receiver functions stacked in bins. Arrival times of Sp phases were converted into depth domain using the IASP91 reference velocity model. A relatively shallow LAB at about 80-90 km depth was observed beneath the whole plateau with some exceptions. A low velocity zone was found at about 100 km beneath the Zagros fold and thrust belt and reaching 130 km beneath the Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, whereas other tectonic zones are recognized by a thin lithosphere of about 80-90 km. This technique can introduce an error up to 10 km in the LAB depth determination.

Keywords